Paleomagnetism zine and classroom activity

Paleomagnetism zine and classroom activity

More resources! A zine (ie comic) about paleomagnetism, with an accompanying classroom activity. Paleomagnetists like Saiko and Tim study the way the magnetic field of the Earth flips to help understand more about the sediment cores the JOIDES collects. Paleomagnetism zine The zine should be printed with 2-4 pages per sheet, then cut up and stapled together into a small booklet just like the one Saiko and Tim have in the picture above. Paleomagnetism classroom activity…

Dinoflagellate Zine and Classroom Activity

Dinoflagellate Zine and Classroom Activity

Here’s another two of resources you might like:  A zine (ie comic) about dinoflagellates, with an accompanying classroom activity. Dinoflagellates are tiny creatures which live in the ocean. Scientists on board the ship have been studying the tiny fossils of ancient dinoflagellates to understand more about the history of Antarctica. Dinoflagellate zine The zine should be printed with 2-4 pages per sheet, then cut up and stapled together into a small booklet. Dinoflagellates classroom activity This…

Physical Properties Zine and Worksheet

Physical Properties Zine and Worksheet

Teachers, here’s a couple of resources you might like:  A zine (ie comic) about physical properties and downhole logging, with an accompanying classroom activity. Physical Properties Zine The zine should be printed with 2-4 pages per sheet, then cut up and stapled together into a small booklet as Jenny is demonstrating in the picture above. JR physical properties activity This is a classroom activity which would suit 13-year-old students or so — depends on your students!…

How do we know that the world was once covered by a thick ice cap?

How do we know that the world was once covered by a thick ice cap?

Our co-chief scientist Laura had a go at the simple science challenge — she didn’t manage to keep within the most common thousand words of English, but she did write a very nice explanation of her work: How do we know that the world was once covered by a thick ice cap? It’s now disappeared! But when it melted, a long time ago, humans did not have a video camera and nobody has recorded or…

Simple Science

Simple Science

Last week some of the people on our ship tried to write about their work using only the most-used 1000 words in English. This idea came from a book called Thing Explainer and now a lot of people try to explain really hard ideas using these simple words. People who know a lot about their work can sometimes confuse people who don’t know so much, because they use some words that people listening or reading…

Expedition 374 and ice sheet modelling Conversation with Benjamin Keisling, scientist onboard the JOIDES Resolution during Expedition 374

Benjamin, can you please introduce you and explain your research topics? My name is Benjamin Keisling and I am part of the Sedimentology team onboard Expedition 374. I am a PhD Candidate in Geosciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the USA. My PhD research centers on ice sheet modelling, and is particularly focused on how we can use proxy data to constrain uncertain processes and parameters in ice sheet models. In other words,…

Paleomagnetism for Rookies- Part two

Paleomagnetism for Rookies- Part two

From last time, it seemed like studying Earth’s ancient magnetic field was not so complicated, right? Oh, but maybe I omitted a few important details about how the paleomagnetists on board have to deal with some complications… Their ultimate target is to determine the age of the sediment. They do that by determining the polarity of Earth’s magnetic field: sometimes, it is normal (like today), sometimes it is reversed. The paleomagnetists measure the inclination (the…

Do you want to be part of the physical properties’ team on the JOIDES Resolution?

Do you want to be part of the physical properties’ team on the JOIDES Resolution?

Have a look at this blog post! Some physical properties of the cores and what they can tell us about sediments   Earth has experienced many cycles of climate change throughout its geologic history. Records of these past climates can be found in the sediments that we drill during Expedition 374. In order to learn more about past climatic conditions, we have to decipher the information recorded in the cores. Scientists on board the JOIDES…

A hole in the ship?

A hole in the ship?

During Expedition 374, the moonpool was fully opened to lower the subsea camera system to the sea floor. I have always heard about Archimedes’ principle and I know that it explains why heavy ships like the JOIDES Resolution (145 m long and 21 m wide) can float on the water without sinking. But, I didn’t think that it could be compatible with the presence of a hole like the moonpool in the bottom of the…