Blog Posts Tagged "scientific drilling"

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Every once in awhile there will be external blogging from the ship by education officer, Amy West. Here is a snippet of the first one:

Going on a Rock Cruise

Imagine two, 60-mile-thick slabs of rock running into each other. Which gives first and why?

Houston, we've landed on….Boninite

Our entire mission is dependent on seismic data and our interpretation of it. We can be wildly off, or spot on with what we think we’ll encounter during drilling. It’s a highly educated guess, but what worried many members of the team was drilling through too much sediment before they hit the hard rock.

A unique way to install a reentry system at Site U1440B

Since we have already drilled a hole at Site U1440 (approximately 20 meters from where we are now) and collected sediment cores from that hole up until we hit hard rock, we started our second hole in a whole new way. Because this hole will be used to obtain cores from deeper depths we need to 'case' the hole to keep it stable. We also need to be able to re enter it several times.

Logging without an axe

Though structural geologists use our smaller sample of cored rock to form the larger picture< of what its surrounding rock may look like, confirmation about the hole’s physical and chemical traits comes from the work of our logging staff scientist, Sally Morgan.