Blog Posts Tagged "seamount"

What is a Seamount?

Yesterday, the JOIDES Resolution set sail from Auckland, New Zealand into the Pacific Ocean to drill on the seamounts of the Louisville Seamount trail. This may cause you to ask a lot of questions, one of which probably is: what in the world is a seamount?

How the Ring of Fire is an Exclusive Club the Louisville Seamount Trail Cannot Get Into

If you look at the picture that accompanies this blog, you will notice that just to the left of the Louisville seamount trail is a dark blue line that runs all the way down to New Zealand. That line is a boundary. To the left of it all the volcanoes (and there are a lot of them) are in the Pacific Ring of Fire.

Make a Seamount Trail in the Classroom

Learn about a hands-on activity that can help students visualize how a hotspot and a moving plate can create a seamount trail.

Why Starting a Relationship with a Hotspot is Going to be Complicated

Hotspots are like the strong, silent type. On the surface it is obvious they are very powerful, but it is difficult to find out what is going on with them underneath the surface, because there is no way to force your way down there.

Why Sedimentology Rules!

Meet David Buchs, one of the geologists onboard the JOIDES Resolution, and find out how sedimentary rock can tell him what a seamount was like when it used to be an island.

Seamount Lasagna

The inside of a seamount is not the same from top to bottom. If it was the same, there would be no need to drill into it. We could just scrape some rock off the top of it and that would tell us everything we would need to know about the inside of the seamount and how it was formed. A seamount is not homogenous, though.

Journey Not Quite to the Center of the Earth Strikes Back

For the Unobtainium Falcon to travel inside the earth, it has to have a lot more features than your parents’ minivan. First it needs to be able to travel through the ocean, then it needs to drill through solid rock and then it needs to be able to move through incredibly hot magma that can be thicker than honey.