Blogs

Six Week Malaise and its Impact on our Food

There is a strange malaise that begins to descend on the ship in week six - cabin fever!

Meet your Expedition 350 science team!

Who are these scientists anyways and how did they get here?

Don't Earn a Darwin Award!

Nearly seven weeks on board a ship that is only 147 metres long, and I have still not been to all the spaces there are to see! I thought we should try and investigate a little more while we still could! Bob was our intrepid guide because he has been on the ship a number of times before.

Something for Everyone!

This week I had the very good fortune to be able to deliver a video-session to Pinewood School for students aged 11-16 with additional needs, in Scotland, UK.

More on Leg 163: Wayne Malone's Most Intense Moment

If you’re following along the “Perfect Storm” blog post story from my last blog, I mentioned another individual who was also onboard Leg 163. I was interested in meeting more of the Siem Offshore team (they handle all of the drilling activities and equipment) and hearing another account of Leg 163.

Big Fish Eat Small Fish!

Today was a perfect day – blue sky and sea – radiant sunshine and a calm surface on the water allowing the light to penetrate deep into the aquamarine depths. It was a day to have lunch on deck and our wonderful galley crew did us proud, bringing a complete barbeque plus salad, sweets and fruit up onto the deck so we could all eat in the sunshine.

Navigation

When you stand outside, on a ship, in the middle of a vast expanse of water, you become completely disorientated because there is nothing in any direction with which to orientate yourself. On land you are nearly always within sight of something notable – a hill, a copse of trees, a road or a church tower – something that can help you to know where you are.

"The Perfect Storm": Leg 163 on the JOIDES Resolution

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"The Perfect Storm": Leg 163 on the JOIDES Resolution

The Fossil's Tale!

The word fossil comes from the Latin word ‘fossilis’ meaning ‘dug up’. People who go fossil hunting are looking for something that they can literally dig out of the ground and take home!

Invisible Rock!

Well, perhaps not quite invisible, but if you take a very, very thin piece of rock it is possible to see right through it! Now when I say thin, I really do mean thin! But who needs to see through rocks anyway? It isn’t just for fun!

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