Paleomagnetism for Rookies- Part two

Paleomagnetism for Rookies- Part two

From last time, it seemed like studying Earth’s ancient magnetic field was not so complicated, right? Oh, but maybe I omitted a few important details about how the paleomagnetists on board have to deal with some complications… Their ultimate target is to determine the age of the sediment. They do that by determining the polarity of Earth’s magnetic field: sometimes, it is normal (like today), sometimes it is reversed. The paleomagnetists measure the inclination (the…

A hole in the ship?

A hole in the ship?

During Expedition 374, the moonpool was fully opened to lower the subsea camera system to the sea floor. I have always heard about Archimedes’ principle and I know that it explains why heavy ships like the JOIDES Resolution (145 m long and 21 m wide) can float on the water without sinking. But, I didn’t think that it could be compatible with the presence of a hole like the moonpool in the bottom of the…

360 Video: Core on Deck

360 Video: Core on Deck

This is our first in a series of 360 videos. This video shows a core coming on deck on the catwalk. It fades to a microbiologist taking a sample from the core, and then the technicians beginning to take the 1.5 meter sections of the cores into the lab. On the wall opposite the core liner, you can see a micropaleontologist waiting for the core catcher sample to take back to the lab. In the…

Episode 1: Reaching the mid-Miocene

Episode 1: Reaching the mid-Miocene

  Episode 1: Reaching the mid-Miocene Drilling at the first site is complete. Scientists looked at cores that revealed the presence of former glaciations and reached back in time about 16 million years to the period of geologic history known as the mid-Miocene. The mid-Miocene is important because it was a warm period in Earth’s history, similar to how it is today. Because of this past warmth, the mid-Miocene may provide an analog to what lies in store…

Fulbright student Imogen Browne

Fulbright student Imogen Browne

Imogen Browne is a Fulbright student from New Zealand doing her Ph.D. in marine science at the University of South Florida. She is sailing as a physical properties specialist aboard the JOIDES Resolution during Expedition 374: Ross Sea West Antarctic Ice Sheet History. In this video she walks us through her work on the ship.

Life onboard our polar expedition

Life onboard our polar expedition

Much has happened in our 8 day transit from New Zealand to Antarctica. We learned about each other’s science and how we will work together in the coming weeks, hearing talks and taking tours. We crossed the Antarctic Circle and the Prime Meridian, and celebrated co-chief scientist Rob McKay’s birthday with a surprise party. Meals have been good, the gym frequented, sleep cherished. And during the transit we settled into life aboard ship. The ship…

Previous scientific expeditions in the Ross Sea (from DSP to Expedition 374)

Previous scientific expeditions in the Ross Sea (from DSP to Expedition 374)

In 2006-2007, the multinational ANtarctic geological DRILLing (ANDRILL) brought together a team of over 200 scientists, drillers, and technicians. They spent a combined six months on the Ross Ice Shelf over two seasons. They drilled 2 holes through several hundred feet of ice and ocean water to reach the marine sediments. These sediments are the memory of past climate. They contain the ice sheet history of the Ross Ice Shelf. Scientists wanted to learn more…

Scientist Post: Imogen Browne

Scientist Post: Imogen Browne

Imogen Browne is a Ph.D. student at the University of South Florida studying under Dr. Amelia Shevenell. Both are onboard scientists for Expedition 374, working as a physical properties specialist and sedimentologist respectively. Check out Dr. Shevenell’s blog, “Expedition Antarctica“. We will be resposting content from that blog as the expedition goes on. Follow Dr. Shevenell on Twitter at @ashevenell and Imogen Browne on Twitter at @ImogenMireille. Journeying to the Ross Sea, Antarctica aboard the…