Life onboard our polar expedition

Life onboard our polar expedition

Much has happened in our 8 day transit from New Zealand to Antarctica. We learned about each other’s science and how we will work together in the coming weeks, hearing talks and taking tours. We crossed the Antarctic Circle and the Prime Meridian, and celebrated co-chief scientist Rob McKay’s birthday with a surprise party. Meals have been good, the gym frequented, sleep cherished. And during the transit we settled into life aboard ship. The ship…

Previous scientific expeditions in the Ross Sea (from DSP to Expedition 374)

Previous scientific expeditions in the Ross Sea (from DSP to Expedition 374)

In 2006-2007, the multinational ANtarctic geological DRILLing (ANDRILL) brought together a team of over 200 scientists, drillers, and technicians. They spent a combined six months on the Ross Ice Shelf over two seasons. They drilled 2 holes through several hundred feet of ice and ocean water to reach the marine sediments. These sediments are the memory of past climate. They contain the ice sheet history of the Ross Ice Shelf. Scientists wanted to learn more…

Exp 374 Trailer

Exp 374 Trailer

Watch on YouTube: the Exp 374 Trailer Forty-five years ago, Leg 28 of the Ocean Drilling Program recovered cores from the Ross Sea that changed the way we think about Antarctic ice. Every decade our knowledge has advanced through more Antarctic drilling expeditions, including ANDRILL projects. Now, the International Ocean Discovery Program makes a long-awaited return to the Ross Sea on Expedition 374. Scientists from 13 different nations will look back in time to understand…

A landscape of ice

A landscape of ice

“So much water, so much water….” is a famous quote by our former president Mac Mahon (French president from 1873 to 1879). He would have said these words in front of dramatic flooding in the city of Toulouse. If this quote was applied to Antarctica today, I would like to switch it to “So much ice, so much ice….” Antarctica is the biggest freshwater reservoir on the planet, mainly in the form of ice. About…

Scientist Post: Francesca Sangiorgi

Scientist Post: Francesca Sangiorgi

Francesca Sangiorgi is a scientist sailing on expedition 374. She works as an assistant professor at Utrecht University. She will will be posting brief updates throughout the cruise, which will be shared here. More on her work: Dr. Sangiorgi’s main interests include eutrophication trends, natural variability vs anthropogenic changes in coastal areas, Neogene climate in the Arctic and Antarctic Oceans, Late Quaternary paleoceanography of the Mediterranean Sea including episodes of widespread anoxia (sapropels). Dr. Sangiorgi focuses on…

Scientist Post: Brian Romans

Scientist Post: Brian Romans

Brian Romans is a scientist sailing aboard Expedition 374. He will blogging on his home institution’s – Virginia Tech – website here, and we will re-post his updates. Below are his first two posts, from October 19 and January 7. You can also follow Dr. Romans on Twitter and Instagram.   Getting ready to set sail Originally posted January 7, 2018 on the Virginia Tech Sedimentary Systems Research blog.  I’ve been in Lyttelton, New Zealand (port town…

Port Call

Port Call

Kia Ora from Lyttelton! I’m thrilled to be one of three onboard education and outreach officers for Expedition 374: Ross Sea West Antarctic Ice Sheet History who will be blogging throughout our nine week journey. My name is Kim Kenny and my communication colleagues are Rosa Hughes-Currie and Agnès Pointu. The expedition is led by co-chiefs Laura De Santis and Rob McKay. View the full team here.  The JOIDES Resolution pulled into the port of Lyttelton,…

Guest Blog: Satoko Owari, Inorganic Geochemist

Guest Blog: Satoko Owari, Inorganic Geochemist

My research topic is identifying the source and migration of fluids in marine sediments using radioactive iodine (129I) with a half-life of 15.7 million years. Half-life is the time it takes half of the atoms of a material to decay. Previous work with iodine isotopes (isotopes: atoms of the same element with different numbers of neutrons) has demonstrated that the way a fluid (e.g., water, gas) moves through sediment depends on the physical properties (e.g., porosity,…

2018 – 50 years of scientific ocean drilling!

2018 – 50 years of scientific ocean drilling!

Ngā mihi o te tau hou!! Happy New Year from the JOIDES Resolution! We had the pleasure of celebrating the start of 2018 just west of the international date line, in the first time zone!! 2018 is an important year for IODP because it represents 50 years of the scientific ocean drilling program. The program name may have changed over the years, but the goals and objectives have continued to be related to discovering Earth’s…