Life onboard our polar expedition

Life onboard our polar expedition

Much has happened in our 8 day transit from New Zealand to Antarctica. We learned about each other’s science and how we will work together in the coming weeks, hearing talks and taking tours. We crossed the Antarctic Circle and the Prime Meridian, and celebrated co-chief scientist Rob McKay’s birthday with a surprise party. Meals have been good, the gym frequented, sleep cherished. And during the transit we settled into life aboard ship. The ship…

Scientist Post: Imogen Browne

Scientist Post: Imogen Browne

Imogen Browne is a Ph.D. student at the University of South Florida studying under Dr. Amelia Shevenell. Both are onboard scientists for Expedition 374, working as a physical properties specialist and sedimentologist respectively. Check out Dr. Shevenell’s blog, “Expedition Antarctica“. We will be resposting content from that blog as the expedition goes on. Follow Dr. Shevenell on Twitter at @ashevenell and Imogen Browne on Twitter at @ImogenMireille. Journeying to the Ross Sea, Antarctica aboard the…

Exp 374 Trailer

Exp 374 Trailer

Watch on YouTube: the Exp 374 Trailer Forty-five years ago, Leg 28 of the Ocean Drilling Program recovered cores from the Ross Sea that changed the way we think about Antarctic ice. Every decade our knowledge has advanced through more Antarctic drilling expeditions, including ANDRILL projects. Now, the International Ocean Discovery Program makes a long-awaited return to the Ross Sea on Expedition 374. Scientists from 13 different nations will look back in time to understand…

Scientist Post: Brian Romans

Scientist Post: Brian Romans

Brian Romans is a scientist sailing aboard Expedition 374. He will blogging on his home institution’s – Virginia Tech – website here, and we will re-post his updates. Below are his first two posts, from October 19 and January 7. You can also follow Dr. Romans on Twitter and Instagram.   Getting ready to set sail Originally posted January 7, 2018 on the Virginia Tech Sedimentary Systems Research blog.  I’ve been in Lyttelton, New Zealand (port town…

Port Call

Port Call

Kia Ora from Lyttelton! I’m thrilled to be one of three onboard education and outreach officers for Expedition 374: Ross Sea West Antarctic Ice Sheet History who will be blogging throughout our nine week journey. My name is Kim Kenny and my communication colleagues are Rosa Hughes-Currie and Agnès Pointu. The expedition is led by co-chiefs Laura De Santis and Rob McKay. View the full team here.  The JOIDES Resolution pulled into the port of Lyttelton,…

Guest Blog: Satoko Owari, Inorganic Geochemist

Guest Blog: Satoko Owari, Inorganic Geochemist

My research topic is identifying the source and migration of fluids in marine sediments using radioactive iodine (129I) with a half-life of 15.7 million years. Half-life is the time it takes half of the atoms of a material to decay. Previous work with iodine isotopes (isotopes: atoms of the same element with different numbers of neutrons) has demonstrated that the way a fluid (e.g., water, gas) moves through sediment depends on the physical properties (e.g., porosity,…

Tracy’s Way – How to Get Geoscience Superpowers

Tracy’s Way – How to Get Geoscience Superpowers

Tracy Quan, a scientist sailing on Expedition 369, had this to say about the how and why to becoming a geoscientist… Several times a year, I get the chance to participate in a few outreach programs designed to introduce secondary school students and their teachers to the geosciences. One of the questions that frequently gets asked is what type of classes or skills would be useful for someone who might want to become a geologist….

Postcards from Scientists – Lauren’s crushing chemistry duties

G’day! I’m Lauren O’Connor, a shipboard geochemist on Expedition 369. I’m from Brisbane, on the east coast of Australia, but I currently live in England, where I’ve just finished my PhD at the University of Oxford. My work on the JOIDES Resolution usually involves crushing rocks and weighing the powders. Not terribly exciting, but the wealth of information that you can get from analysing these powders makes it worthwhile! The chemistry of these rocks can…