Expedition 374 and ice sheet modelling Conversation with Benjamin Keisling, scientist onboard the JOIDES Resolution during Expedition 374

Benjamin, can you please introduce you and explain your research topics? My name is Benjamin Keisling and I am part of the Sedimentology team onboard Expedition 374. I am a PhD Candidate in Geosciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the USA. My PhD research centers on ice sheet modelling, and is particularly focused on how we can use proxy data to constrain uncertain processes and parameters in ice sheet models. In other words,…

Not all ice sheets are the same!

Not all ice sheets are the same!

The Antarctic ice sheet is the main polar ice cap of the Earth and covers about 98% of the continent. About 61% of all the fresh water on Earth is held in this ice sheet which covers almost 14 million square kilometers. However, the ice sheet which covers West Antarctica does not have the same behavior as the one which lies on East Antarctica. This picture shows that the average ice thickness is different across…

Fulbright student Imogen Browne

Fulbright student Imogen Browne

Imogen Browne is a Fulbright student from New Zealand doing her Ph.D. in marine science at the University of South Florida. She is sailing as a physical properties specialist aboard the JOIDES Resolution during Expedition 374: Ross Sea West Antarctic Ice Sheet History. In this video she walks us through her work on the ship.

The Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration

The Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration

Our expedition to the Ross Sea echoes the journeys of Antarctic explorers more than a century before us. This very area is where the famed Ernest Shackleton, Robert Scott, Roald Amundsen, and James Ross strode out onto the ice to begin their epic adventures, some of which ended in disaster and others in triumph. What is known today as the Ross Ice Shelf used to be called The Barrier, because it was a barrier from…

The complex interactions between ice and oceans

The complex interactions between ice and oceans

The Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) is the worlds largest ocean current, and the only current that flows completely around the globe. The ACC flows eastward around the Antarctic continent and connects with the southern portions of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. Nearer the continent the easterly winds cause a counter-current with a special clockwise circulation in the great indentations of the Weddell and Ross Seas and they drive to the surface the waters of…

Previous scientific expeditions in the Ross Sea (from DSP to Expedition 374)

Previous scientific expeditions in the Ross Sea (from DSP to Expedition 374)

In 2006-2007, the multinational ANtarctic geological DRILLing (ANDRILL) brought together a team of over 200 scientists, drillers, and technicians. They spent a combined six months on the Ross Ice Shelf over two seasons. They drilled 2 holes through several hundred feet of ice and ocean water to reach the marine sediments. These sediments are the memory of past climate. They contain the ice sheet history of the Ross Ice Shelf. Scientists wanted to learn more…

Scientist Post: Imogen Browne

Scientist Post: Imogen Browne

Imogen Browne is a Ph.D. student at the University of South Florida studying under Dr. Amelia Shevenell. Both are onboard scientists for Expedition 374, working as a physical properties specialist and sedimentologist respectively. Check out Dr. Shevenell’s blog, “Expedition Antarctica“. We will be resposting content from that blog as the expedition goes on. Follow Dr. Shevenell on Twitter at @ashevenell and Imogen Browne on Twitter at @ImogenMireille. Journeying to the Ross Sea, Antarctica aboard the…

A landscape of ice

A landscape of ice

“So much water, so much water….” is a famous quote by our former president Mac Mahon (French president from 1873 to 1879). He would have said these words in front of dramatic flooding in the city of Toulouse. If this quote was applied to Antarctica today, I would like to switch it to “So much ice, so much ice….” Antarctica is the biggest freshwater reservoir on the planet, mainly in the form of ice. About…

Scientist Post: Francesca Sangiorgi

Scientist Post: Francesca Sangiorgi

Francesca Sangiorgi is a scientist sailing on expedition 374. She works as an assistant professor at Utrecht University. She will will be posting brief updates throughout the cruise, which will be shared here. More on her work: Dr. Sangiorgi’s main interests include eutrophication trends, natural variability vs anthropogenic changes in coastal areas, Neogene climate in the Arctic and Antarctic Oceans, Late Quaternary paleoceanography of the Mediterranean Sea including episodes of widespread anoxia (sapropels). Dr. Sangiorgi focuses on…

Scientist Post: Brian Romans

Scientist Post: Brian Romans

Brian Romans is a scientist sailing aboard Expedition 374. He will blogging on his home institution’s – Virginia Tech – website here, and we will re-post his updates. Below are his first two posts, from October 19 and January 7. You can also follow Dr. Romans on Twitter and Instagram.   Getting ready to set sail Originally posted January 7, 2018 on the Virginia Tech Sedimentary Systems Research blog.  I’ve been in Lyttelton, New Zealand (port town…