seamount

Journey Through the Midnight Zone

Today during one of my live classroom broadcasts, a student asked what it felt like to be higher than Mount Everest. The student was referring to our location above the Mariana Trench--the deepest part of the ocean (35,827 feet deep), often contrasted with Mount Everest since its the highest point on earth (29,035 feet high). 

New Video: Science Spotlight on Geological "Forensics"

Check out our latest video<--Kevin Johnson, Geologist extraordinaire from the University of Hawaii, describes how he digs deep (literally!) to find evidence of tectonic plate movement and its impacts on mantle rocks that travel from deep within the Earth up to the surface and back again. It's CSI, geology edition!

Tale as Old as Time--Secrets of the Mud Volcanoes

Hidden within the countless layers of rock, sediment, and fossilized creatures beneath the Earth’s surface are fascinating stories of the history of our planet—stories of how you and I came to exist. 

Erster Einsatz: South Chamorro Seamount

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"Korken an Deck"

Journey Not Quite to the Center of the Earth Strikes Back

For the Unobtainium Falcon to travel inside the earth, it has to have a lot more features than your parents’ minivan. First it needs to be able to travel through the ocean, then it needs to drill through solid rock and then it needs to be able to move through incredibly hot magma that can be thicker than honey.

Seamount Lasagna

The inside of a seamount is not the same from top to bottom. If it was the same, there would be no need to drill into it. We could just scrape some rock off the top of it and that would tell us everything we would need to know about the inside of the seamount and how it was formed. A seamount is not homogenous, though.

Why Sedimentology Rules!

Meet David Buchs, one of the geologists onboard the JOIDES Resolution, and find out how sedimentary rock can tell him what a seamount was like when it used to be an island.

Why Starting a Relationship with a Hotspot is Going to be Complicated

Hotspots are like the strong, silent type. On the surface it is obvious they are very powerful, but it is difficult to find out what is going on with them underneath the surface, because there is no way to force your way down there.

Make a Seamount Trail in the Classroom

Learn about a hands-on activity that can help students visualize how a hotspot and a moving plate can create a seamount trail.

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