Blogs

Weekend Specials

It's the weekend! That means everything proceeds as normal on board, except on-shore colleagues don't read their emails, we don't have video conferences with schools, and we have Very Special Food.

What’s an Earthquake?

Earthquakes may bring to mind fear and danger or perhaps confusion and curiosity. Some earthquakes can be very destructive, as we have seen in several recent events. To help mitigate the damage and loss of life, earthquake scientists aim to better understand the physical context of great earthquakes, like the 2004 M 9 Sumatra-Adaman Earthquake. That’s part of the goal of Expedition 362. But first, we need to know what an earthquake is.

Everybody wants to be a cat

When you hear "CORE ON DECK- CORE ON DECK" (it's always twice, not once, not three times, just twice), you have to go to the catwalk.  It is a narrow, covered work area, wide enough for a lot of obese Maine coon cats however. I don't really understand that name. Maybe because I am French?

What is a subduction zone?

What can we learn from Earth's magnetic field?

While we're casing and preparing to core Hole G at Site U1480, as Agnes wrote about in her recent post, the scientists are mostly working on their reports and discussing their initial interpretations. We have a bit of down time, and we wanted to make use of the great movie lounge downstairs. We watched the geo-fiction movie, The Core.

Today in Geology History: In Memory of Marie Tharp, Pioneering Oceanographer

Think of the first time you saw a map of the world. It probably looked like colorful patches mostly connected to other colorful patches, with a vast scape of blue between the colorful areas. Until the 1940s, that’s how many people imagined the ocean: “a uniform, featureless blue border for the continents.” We commemorate Marie Tharp with a photo of many of the women on the current research cruise of the JR and a brief summary of her work, which includes creating the first seafloor maps of the world's oceans and establishing the global distribution of mid-ocean ridges.

It's the case-ing !

Yesterday, we starded our next hole in a new way because this time, we want to drill until the sediment/basement interface (1450 mbsl)! Before that, we have to build a reentry system that includes 754 m of "casing".

What is casing?

The best room on the ship

You can argue about this--perhaps the Core Lab, the Chem Lab, the Gym, one's own cabin--but I think the best room on board is the Mess Hall or Galley. The place we enjoy all our meals and cookie breaks together.

Scales Are Not Just For Fish: Time and Space in Geology

Blog Series Installment #2: Space as Time

Attack the mud!

Deep hole often requires several changes of drill bits. When you drill the bottom of the seafloor, we can use the Advanced Piston Corer (APC) which is used to recover relatively undisturbed sediments from very soft to firm sediments.

The APC is a hydraulically actuated piston corer and it allows to recover continuous 9.5 m samples.

How does it work?

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