Blogs

Cutting the Cores – Day 38, 8/11/2009

Every core that arrives on the JR has to be split into two halves at some point in the process. Much of the information contained in the layers of mud and rock is is damaged due to the invasive nature of the drilling process. To get a clean view of the core as it looked in the ground we must look at the innermost portions of the core. This means cutting it in half. Since cores can come in all consistencies, from soupy mud to hard rock. That means the technicians need to be prepared to cut a wide range of materials that come up in the core liners.

Correlate, Correlate, and Correlate

Hello everybody. I am Tats Sakamoto from JAMSTEC, Japan. I am one of the on board stratigraphic correlators who is going to be tracking any data set (mainly data corrected by fask-track multi sensor core logger, whole-round multi sensor core logger, natural gamma intensity logger, and split core core reflectance) and then I correlate data sets between drilling holes.

The Technician's Point of View: Tracks and Catwalks

Chris Beveridge is a Physical Properties Technician on Expedition 323. He has agreed to share some of his experiences and tell you a little bit more about what he does on board the JOIDES Resolution.

A Quick Update and Some Links to Enjoy – Day 35, 8/8/2009

Just a quick update to let you know how things are going.  Drilling is going very smoothly on site U1343.  We are almost done with hole C at this site.  If things continue we should have enough time to get in two more sites before we head to Yokahama.  Pretty exciting, as the opportunity to find out more of the history of the Bering Sea is really close.  I expect t

The Technician's Point of View

Chris Beveridge is a Physical Properties Technician on Expedition 323.  He has agreed to share some of his experiences and tell you a little bit more about what he does on board the JOIDES Resolution.

Beauty of the hump

Hump day...

... is the time when people start separating into two groups, the "half-empty" and the "half-full" ones.

The Mystery of the Exploding Cores – Day 31, 8/4/2009

Why do some cores explode?  One of the problems we’ve had on this expedition is that some of the cores are a bit gaseous. As you go to the sea floor and below it, the pressure from the water above is tremendous. Styrofoam coffee cups dropped to the sea floor come back a fraction of their original size. Why is that?

Micropaleontology research on the Joides Resolution: Discovery

This is the third and final part of Sev's documentation of the daily process of a foram paleontologist on board the JR.  In this blog you can see a little of what he sees as we begin to understand what the cores can tell us. 

Nuestro (escaso) tiempo libre

Alguien me ha preguntado qué hacemos en nuestro tiempo libre, y supongo que la mayoría de vosotros también os lo habréis planteado. Bueno, la verdad es que si tenéis en cuenta que, de las 12 horas que tenemos libres, parte de ellas las empleamos en dormir, desayunar y cenar, tampoco nos queda mucho más tiempo.

Coffee Makes the Science Go Around

We are now in the middle of the drilling at Bowers Ridge, and everything is going very well. However, one does sometimes get tired during the shift despite exciting results. My shift is from midnight to noon and though I turned the clock weeks ago, I got very tired yesterday morning, so I pulled out my secret weapon: coffee beans from my favorite brand.

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